A survey of travellers carrying host fruit of Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), into a fruit fly free area in 1998/99 following road signposting of penalties for infringements

Bernie DominiakA and Idris BarchiaB

A NSW Department of Primary Industries, Locked Bag 21, Orange, New South Wales 2800, Australia.

B NSW Department of Primary Industries, RMB 8, Camden, New South Wales 2570, Australia.


Abstract

For the first time external contractors were used for roadside vehicle inspection operations. There were 5556 surveyed vehicles, with an average of 9.7% found carrying fruit, with a range of 4.8% at Kamarah, 8.6% on the Sturt Highway site and 18% on the Newell Highway site. There was no change in the proportion of travellers carrying fruit into the Newell site over the previous four years however the other two sites showed a decline. Of the main fruit types (pome, stone, citrus, bananas, tomatoes), there were 3166 items of fruit seized at an average of 5.9 fruits per vehicle. Tomatoes were the most commonly carried fruit (30.4%), followed by pome fruit (23.7%) and stone fruit (16%). Generally, travellers originating from areas near the inspection site were less likely to carry fruit but pose the greatest threat in a risk analysis. Retired adults remain most likely to carry fruit, followed by families; however families pose the greatest threat in a risk analysis. The erection of road signs in late December, advising of $200 penalties for the introduction of fruit, resulted in a 50% decline in the proportion of travellers carrying fruit into the area.

 

Plant Protection Quarterly (2005) 20 (4) 148-154.